Writer’s Quote Wednesday -Birthday Bash

Welcome back to Writer’s Quote Wednesday! This is a weekly get together across many blogs and hosted by the fabulous Silver Threading! Check out her blog for the week here and while you’re at it, check out the amazing Ronovan’s #BeWOW (Be Wonderful (or Writing) on Wednesdays) and see what that’s all about in this post. Silver and Ronovan joined forces and we like to Be Wonderful and Quote Writers all over the place on Wednesdays. 

Today would be Charles Lutwidge Dodgson’s 184th birthday and, since he wrote one of my favorite children’s books of all time I thought I would take today to share some quotes from a great author…better known as Lewis Carroll. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass inspire creativity, self acceptance, and a love of strangeness. The Mad Hatter has long been one of my favorite literary characters and the quotes I’ve chosen for you today share that oddness and whimsy that translates into lyrical sentences and happy times. They always remind me that I am an author, a creator, and a fairy tale of swirling words waiting to be written down!

Without further ado…welcome to the wonderful, whimsical, writing world of Lewis Carroll:

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This quote is handy for authors, I think of it all the time as I write and try to make sure my audience has room for their imaginations. 

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selfish actions tend to make us feel poorly in the end…but things we can enjoy with or for others make life a little sweeter every day. 

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If you wrote a sentence, read a page, ran an errand, or even just washed the dishes, you’ve come farther than you know! Every day, every action,very choice, every breath…look how far you’ve come. 

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Write the story, live the story, go kiss that crush you’ve been aiming for..whatever. 

Finally, these two speak for themselves. We are, each of us, something amazing and unique. Don’t worry about the differences, celebrate them!

Last Lines

I recently read an article on the first lines of a novel (http://cristianmihai.net/2014/01/28/opening-lines-2/) and in thinking about those, my mind slowly turned to the last lines of my favorite works.

Some of the most moving, and sometimes simple, lines of text in literature are the finale sentences. They are the culmination of their tales, the punctuation at the end of the sentence. And they can sometimes change the entire feeling of the novel.

Although not a novel, one of my absolute favorite last lines in all of literature is that of William Shakespeare’s King Lear. After five acts of his life, the entire story is summed up and left hanging on two little words, “He died.” I’m not too proud to admit that I cry every time.

(the movie end, slightly different but beautiful: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPI5EgqQoy0)

After amazing adventures and death defying acts made even more amazing and frightening due to their small stature, the hobbits return home at the end of The Return of the King and the final line, said by Samwise Gamgee, is this: “Well, I’m Home then.” What simple fervor and contentment this brings to me. He’s home, they are home, and after everything he has been through, Frodo’s faithful gardener and best friend sits in his chair with his family, and is home.

(images courtesy of a convoluted line of repinners on Pinterest)

At the end of Louisa May Alcott’s thriller love story, A Long Fatal Love Chase (published two years before Little Women and well worth the read) Tempest, described as a libertine who resembles Mephistopheles (i.e. a man of low/no moral character who resembles a demon, or possibly the demon), gathers his drowned wife in his arms and stabs himself, declaring defiantly “Mine first-Mine Last-Mine even to the grave” I got chills just typing that up for you.

                                                    (picture via Eleanor Mackender

   Guildford Castle secret garden)

Some books, like Alice’s Adventures Through the Looking Glass leave their reader to wonder exactly what happened, or will happen. Though Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland ended with a paragraphical sentence describing how Alice would be when older, Through the Looking Glass leaves us with the questions, “which do you think it was?” I, personally, believe it was all real.

Finally, the sum of everything that happened in one of the most famous book series to have been written in many, many years, J.K. Rowling’s final sentence in the epilogue of The Deathly Hollows is this, “The scar had not pained Harry for nineteen years. All was well.” Every time I re-read this book, and this line, I feel both a weight on my heart from the losses and a weight lifted because now there is safety. Now both the muggle world, and the wizarding world, are free to exist as they do without threat from a man who wouldn’t just die when he was supposed to.

Yes, I know these are books and not technically reality. However, they are a big part of my life and, hopefully, will be a big part in the lives of many of the children in the world. Books provide escapes, imagination exercises, and just good fun. So now that I’ve shown you mine, why don’t you show me yours? What are some of your favorite closing lines?

Aside

Characters

Tomorrow is “National Reading Day” in the U.S.A., a day for pre-k thru 3rd graders to (hopefully) happily read and develop the literacy foundation they’ll need throughout school and life. (http://national-reading-day.org)

Thinking about the books I loved in elementary school made me realize something I had never really thought about before.

When you think about great classic books, especially children’s books, you remember the general setting, the tone, and of course, the main characters. Everyone remembers Peter Pan from Neverland had a friend named Tinkerbell. We all know that the Red Queen chased Alice through Wonderland. And who could forget that Aslan welcomed the Pevensie children into Narnia…well, eventually. However, does anyone remember the minor characters? Do you have a favorite?

I know that some of my absolute favorite characters are those who seem to slip in and out of the storyline, almost undetected but for a swift pun or stunning swordplay before they once again fade out of the limelight. For example, Nana and the mermaids of Neverland, a myriad of talking animals throughout children’s stories (Reepacheep, the Beavers, DorMouse, Mock Turtle, etc.), and perhaps even the Woodsman of fairy tale lore can be called a minor character who plays a major role.

Some characters have been given the dubious honor of being both a major and minor character in literature. For example, Mr. Tumnus the Fawn plays a great role in the beginning of the Lucy’s adventure into Narnia, but then fades out of the story for a while. The Mad Hatter comes and goes and, though he continues throughout the Wonderland narratives, he does not always have much of a role to play.

I must confess that the Mad Hatter is my favorite character from the Lewis Carroll’s works, and the subsequent television and film adaptations. Who is your favorite “minor character”?

May your imagination never cease to amaze, may your life follow your dreams, and may you have a Blessed Day!