The Next Generation

Displaying CAM03656.jpg

My Monkey setting up for another day of arduous creating. Apparently this story was about Tinkerbell and the dog who sniffed flowers with butter.

My almost 2 year old daughter loves to draw and scribble in her Tinkerbell notebook. If you ask her about it she will go on and on about her work, usually yelling Bell Bell or talking about George and Minions in the few words you can understand. And at some point she will say ‘Like Momma’.

Like Momma, she carries a notebook just about everywhere she goes.(In fact, since her Happy Meals started handing out notebooks she may have MORE than I do). Like Momma, she sometimes only needs to scribble for a moment and sometimes she’s bent over the book for hours. Like Momma, she babbles somewhat incoherently at people if they interrupt her flow or she seems ‘stuck’ in her story.

A BIG part of me is proud that my daughter looks up to me, even though I’m sure that its mostly because she sees me all day everyday. I am proud of her creativity and interest in reading and writing. She isn’t quite 2 (we’re 3 months out from her birthday) but she is already fairly advanced (the hazards of her parent and grandparents all being teachers I suppose). I hope and pray that she keeps this curiosity and zeal as she grows up. That she retains the ‘weird’ and ‘quirk’ that makes up her joy right now and doesn’t let anyone tell her otherwise.

But do I want her to be a writer?

That is a tough question. I love writing. I adore putting my colored inks on blank paper and making the designs that pull a story from the air and my brain (same thing, right) and coalescing it in a form many will read. Most of the time I even enjoy the late night inability to sleep because I’m writing, or the jerking from a dead sleep at 3am because my subconscious finally figured out a piece of the story. I also make no money, have a tendency to block out people for days or weeks at a time while I write, get super mean if I can’t just sit and write when the mood hits me (not as much any more…toddlers tend to line out your schedule for you), and am usually tired from working on pieces when I should be asleep.

It has been said that writing is a lonely profession, except for the characters you make for yourself. Do I want my daughter to be lonely and listening to voices in her own head? Do I want her to wake up from a writing stupor and realize that she may have gotten fifteen thousand words written in a day and half, but she hasn’t eaten and hasn’t seen her friends in days? In the mind of a mother, do the pros outweigh the cons? I honestly don’t know at the moment.

The pros are worth more than any amount of cons in my life. If I don’t write I become irrational, erratic, and difficult to live with. Depression, anxiety, dark moods…they set in pretty quickly if I don’t have projects to think on and scribble out. My books and notebooks are some of my greatest joys, right up there with my kid and my flute. The lack of feedback and reviews on both my blog and my Amazon pages frustrates me to no end, but I wouldn’t stop writing for anything; I couldn’t. Do I want that kind of drive for my daughter….YES, YES I DO.

Do I want her to wind up a writer…probably not. But I suppose that’s going to be up to her to decide. Isn’t it?

 

 

5 Things I’ve learned about Writing

Being a writer has always been part of who I am. I don’t really remember a time in which I did not create different characters and scenarios…whether or not I wrote them down. Over all of that time (29 years, give or take my infancy and toddler years, in which I’m sure I made all sorts of fabulous stories that no one could understand) I have learned five things about writing.

 

 

(original picture courtesy of http://forthesomedaybook.wordpress.com/2011/02/27/sermon-sapling-epiphany-8a-in-the-palm-of-gods-hand/)

 

1)      The more you write, the more you CAN write! Keep it up…there is no excuse for not doing what you love to do.

2)      The more you ignore the myth of ‘your muse’ and trudge through without him/her, the more they are likely to visit you. Mythological beings are rather testy about being left out of the equation 😉

3)      Inspiration is really just something that lies waiting in your subconscious, or soul (whichever seems more true/poetic to your life), looking for a trigger and an opening. Much like the ‘muse’ inspiration happens more the more you trudge on without it.

4)      Writing may often be a one woman/man, lonely gig, but I am never truly alone with my work. Ideas, characters, and those people whom I bug with ideas at 3 am are always there to keep me company…whether they like it or not!

5)      No matter how useless you feel spelling and punctuation are, it can mean life or death for some characters, and more so for your complete work. So tread lightly and edit with a fine tooth comb.